Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online
Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online_top

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From the author of Emily''s House comes a “compelling, emotionally gripping”* novel of historical fiction—perfect for readers of America’s First Daughter.

Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1676. Even before Mary Rowlandson was captured by Indians on a winter day of violence and terror, she sometimes found herself in conflict with her rigid Puritan community. Now, her home destroyed, her children lost to her, she has been sold into the service of a powerful woman tribal leader, made a pawn in the ongoing bloody struggle between English settlers and native people.

Battling cold, hunger, and exhaustion, Mary witnesses harrowing brutality but also unexpected kindness. To her confused surprise, she is drawn to her captors’ open and straightforward way of life, a feeling further complicated by her attraction to a generous, protective English-speaking native known as James Printer. All her life, Mary has been taught to fear God, submit to her husband, and abhor Indians. Now, having lived on the other side of the forest, she begins to question the edicts that have guided her, torn between the life she knew and the wisdom the natives have shown her.

Based on the compelling true narrative of Mary Rowlandson, Flight of the Sparrow is an evocative tale that transports the reader to a little-known time in early America and explores the real meanings of freedom, faith, and acceptance.

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Review

Praise for Flight of the Sparrow

“Breathes life into a vital but oft-neglected chapter of our history. Amy Belding Brown has turned an authentic drama of Indian captivity into a compelling, emotionally gripping tale that is at once wrenching and soulful.”—*Eliot Pattison, author of the Mystery of Colonial America series

“A mesmerizing tale of survival and awakening...The deftly depicted cross cultural friendship reminded me of Caleb’s Crossing and the fast-paced story kept me up turning pages.”—Donna Thorland, author of The Turncoat and The Rebel Pirate

“Brown’s voice transforms a remote period into a fresh and immediate world and, in Mary, gives us a heroine who is broken by sorrow but determined to survive. This is a novel about the true meaning of faith and freedom.”—Kelly O’Connor McNees, author of The Island of Doves and The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott

“The story of Mary Rowlandson is the story of one of the darkest episodes in our nation’s history, and yet Amy Belding Brown manages to turn it into a soaring tale of light and hope… The Flight of the Sparrow reminds us of the promise of America and that the fulfillment of that promise relies on every human heart.”—Sally Cabot Gunning, author of Benjamin Franklin’s Bastard, The Widow’s War, Bound, and The Rebellion of Jane Clarke

“In this amazingly written and deeply researched book, Amy Belding Brown delivers 17th-century Massachusetts to the reader with a prose that springs from the page and wraps you in wonder.  Flight of the Sparrow showcases the author’s imagination bound by her dedication to historical fact....This is a book for both readers of literary fiction as well as those who love a well-researched work of historical fiction.”—Historical Novel Society

Praise for Mr. Emerson’s Wife

“Amy Belding Brown has brought her back to life in a novel that glitters with intelligence and authenticity.”—Geraldine Brooks, author of March

“In this extraordinary book, Amy Belding Brown has brought the nineteenth century to life...A soaring imaginative leap, this book combines detailed history with a page-turning illicit love story. It’s a look at a rich moment in American history and a great read, a rare combination.”—Susan Cheever, author of My Name Is Bill and Note Found in a Bottle

“A beautiful work...It is quite refreshing to see that ambition backed up with a quality of writing that bears up to the weight of its subject matter.”—Bret Lott, author of Jewel and A Song I Knew by Heart

About the Author

Amy Belding Brown is the author of Mr. Emerson’s Wife, and her work has appeared in  Yankee, Good Housekeeping, American Way, The Worcester Review and other national, international, and regional magazines.  Married to a United Church of Christ minister and the mother of four grown children, she lives in Vermont and currently teaches at Granite State College.

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
2,202 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Joanna M
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An eye-opening story about a little-known time in American history
Reviewed in the United States on December 31, 2017
On a winter''s morning in 1676, Mary Rowlandson and her fellow Puritans are ambushed by Indians, full of fury at the way they have been treated by the English. Mary can do nothing but watch in horror as friends and family members are brutally murdered, while she and her... See more
On a winter''s morning in 1676, Mary Rowlandson and her fellow Puritans are ambushed by Indians, full of fury at the way they have been treated by the English. Mary can do nothing but watch in horror as friends and family members are brutally murdered, while she and her three children - one seriously wounded - are forced to become the tribe''s slaves.

Based on true events, Brown details Mary''s miles-long march through deep snow, holding her wounded 6-year-old Sarah all the while. Naturally, she''s terrified, knowing only what she''s heard of Indians'' savagery in the local rumors.

But while Mary does endure hardships, life among the Indians as a slave, ironically, provides more freedom than when she was actually free. The Indians spend time in nature and solitude. They laugh and love their children openly - all things that Mary, as a Puritan minister''s wife, has never known.

Is it possible for a white woman to live among the Indians by choice? And if she can''t, how on earth can Mary ever hope to fit in among the English again, having glimpsed an entirely different way of life?

Brown''s skillful blend of historical fact with her own details of time and place - along with the ubiquitous feelings that are undoubtedly found in women of every time and place - comprise a book well worth reading.
84 people found this helpful
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Juniper Sage
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Historically inaccurate
Reviewed in the United States on October 6, 2020
The Puritans did not believe in slavery. It was what they escaped in England. They believed in freedom for themselves and all persons. This book tries to push slavery which did not exist with the Puritans. It did exist in the Indian Nations, however. I liked the story in... See more
The Puritans did not believe in slavery. It was what they escaped in England. They believed in freedom for themselves and all persons. This book tries to push slavery which did not exist with the Puritans. It did exist in the Indian Nations, however. I liked the story in the beginning, until it blamed slavery on Puritans, which is a falsehood.
21 people found this helpful
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Nichole LouiseTop Contributor: Star Wars
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Moments of being utterly engrossed
Reviewed in the United States on April 26, 2017
Flight of the Sparrow by Amy Belding Brown tells the true story of 17th century Mary Rowlandson, who survived a Nipmoc attack on the village of Lancaster, MA and was subsequently taken prisoner along with two of her children. After about three months, Rowlandson was... See more
Flight of the Sparrow by Amy Belding Brown tells the true story of 17th century Mary Rowlandson, who survived a Nipmoc attack on the village of Lancaster, MA and was subsequently taken prisoner along with two of her children. After about three months, Rowlandson was ransomed back to the English. She then went on to write a tale of her account, now known as A Narrative of the Captivity, Sufferings and Removes of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson. While Rowlandson’s narrative reflects Puritanical thinking and faith, Brown’s version paints Mary as a woman finding her voice and independence because of her capture.

First off – Flight of the Sparrow has a lot of graphic violence. If you can’t handle that sort of thing, I would advise you probably not read this book because it certainly doesn’t shy away from the shocking and gruesome.

Overall, Brown’s tale is fast-paced and there are often several chapters that are merely chunks of summarized action which I didn’t particularly enjoy. I prefer a style where the narrative has room to slow down and open up, allowing the readers to live presently in the scenes rather than witness several important events rushing by as merely being glossed over. In simplistic terms, there are far too many large chunks of story that are all tell and no show. Although this stylistic choice was disappointing for me, I will say that there were several moments where I was utterly engrossed. I found myself feeling this way mainly during the months of Mary’s captivity and the time she spends forging relationships with the Nipmocs. There is a beautiful and tender, yet tragic relationship that comes out of this time that will leave you yelling at your book–but I won’t discuss that too much since I don’t want to spoil it.

While unlikely the case in real life, Brown’s Rowlandson seems to find her true voice and freedom while enslaved. Her time with the Nipmocs forces her to realize that she was more a slave as a woman within Puritan society and as the wife to a rigid preacher husband. While Mary struggles with her Christian faith after her “redemption,” she finds strength and truth in the compassion and empathy she has for others’ who have been enslaved. In essence, Mary’s eyes would have never been opened if it weren’t for her capture and enslavement. Sometimes, it really does take the act of walking in someone else’s shoes to gain empathy and compassion otherwise lacking.
98 people found this helpful
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Migration
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This is a fine and moving historical novel
Reviewed in the United States on July 7, 2014
As she did in Mr. Emerson''s Wife, Belding Brown has meticulously researched the period she writes about in Flight of the Sparrow. And again, she brings to life a complex woman, Mary Rowlandson, who was captured by Native Americans in 1676 in King Phillip''s War. Belding... See more
As she did in Mr. Emerson''s Wife, Belding Brown has meticulously researched the period she writes about in Flight of the Sparrow. And again, she brings to life a complex woman, Mary Rowlandson, who was captured by Native Americans in 1676 in King Phillip''s War. Belding Brown introduces us to Rowlandson in the opening pages: her compassion for others, including those looked down upon by members of her husband''s Puritan congregation, her outward submission to his will, and the work involved in simply feeding and clothing her family.
After her capture, she is at first shocked by the cultural differences of her captors. As time goes on, however, Rowlandson realizes she has more freedom as a slave of the tribe than she did before her capture. She is touched by the open affection and kindness tribal members have for children, in contrast to the Puritan strict discipline that included whipping children. Make no mistake. Life is hard as the tribe moves to escape British soldiers. They are often hungry and cold. But the burdens are shared equally.
After almost four months, she is returned to her husband who has raised money for her ransom. She is asked to write about her captivity. Belding Brown imagines Rowlandson''s adjustment, not just to her stern husband, but to a woman''s subservience in general. And now Rowlandson can clearly see the hyprocrisy of her society and especially those who profess Christian values but show little or no kindness, only judgement. Even her account of her captivity is skewed by the man who edits it.
Belding Brown paints a compelling picture of 17th century life in colonial America. We are there during Rowlandson''s dramatic captivity, and we are there as she reconciles conflicting values and experience. We hear Rowlandson''s complex voice and strong spirit. This is a fine and moving historical novel.
250 people found this helpful
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kathy
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Revisionist History - Totally Fiction Based on the Author''s Admitted Bias
Reviewed in the United States on May 24, 2021
If you are looking for something based on historical facts - don''t read this book. The only thing true about this was that a Puritan woman was captured by native Americans. I became suspicious half-way thru the book, so I read the end pages containing - author''s notes.... See more
If you are looking for something based on historical facts - don''t read this book. The only thing true about this was that a Puritan woman was captured by native Americans. I became suspicious half-way thru the book, so I read the end pages containing - author''s notes. She said she read the original description of the capture of the puritan woman published a few years after the capture. The author did not like what she saw of the Puritan woman''s attitudes toward the Native American people - sooooo she decided to invent a character she could live with. She tried to blame it on editorializing by a Puritan minister, but I think it was a real stretch. That was the end of the book for me!! I don''t believe in Revisionist History.
10 people found this helpful
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This Kid
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Story Told By An Insufferable Main Character
Reviewed in the United States on July 16, 2020
The main character Mary is the absolute WEEPIEST protagonist I’ve ever read. Granted, she was kidnapped by Indians, but surely there are better ways to describe her torment other than crying. She’s constantly on the verge of tears and openly weeps a good fifty times... See more
The main character Mary is the absolute WEEPIEST protagonist I’ve ever read. Granted, she was kidnapped by Indians, but surely there are better ways to describe her torment other than crying. She’s constantly on the verge of tears and openly weeps a good fifty times throughout this fairly short book. The story itself was fascinating and the setting of Early America riveting, although all the White characters still refer to themselves as “English.” I definitely would recommend this, but be prepared for some serious gore, lots of crying and a completely clueless and idiotic main character. The book too can at times come off as anti-Christian when really I think the writer meant it as a commentary on the stiff Puritans, not Christianity as a whole, yet it does come off as condemning the entire religion of idiocy.
10 people found this helpful
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Karen K. James
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
How a Puritan Wife Adapted to Being an American Indian Slave
Reviewed in the United States on March 1, 2020
When an Indian tribe destroyed her Puritan community in the 1700''s while her minister husband was away, Mary and her 3 children were captured. Many others in the community were murdered so Mary considered her family to be saved by God for a purpose until her youngest child... See more
When an Indian tribe destroyed her Puritan community in the 1700''s while her minister husband was away, Mary and her 3 children were captured. Many others in the community were murdered so Mary considered her family to be saved by God for a purpose until her youngest child died, she was separated from her two older children, and she became a slave to the woman leader of the tribe. Discover how Mary learned to appreciate the Indian ways. Though different (fewer comforts, much less food, and harder work), she was allotted and even fell in love with an educated Indian man who was also imprisoned. When she and her 2 children were freed via ransom and able to return to Puritanism, Mary and her children had difficulty resuming their Puritan way of life. Learn how Mary & Marie found happiness even though they lost Jos to a less confined life. But more important, begin to understand life in the Puritan Colonies, why American Indian way of life enlightened Mary and her children,and learn that slave trade originated in New England, not in the South!
6 people found this helpful
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Rapid Reader
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Enthralling Fictionalized Tale of Mary Richardson, a 17th Century Colonial Puritan Woman''s Time in Native American Captivity
Reviewed in the United States on July 7, 2017
An historical novel with fictionalization that tells the true story of Mary Rowlandson (an actual person) and her time in captivity among Native American Indians. This work is told from her perspective. The material makes for an engaging read with characters of great... See more
An historical novel with fictionalization that tells the true story of Mary Rowlandson (an actual person) and her time in captivity among Native American Indians. This work is told from her perspective. The material makes for an engaging read with characters of great depth. Mary, a 17th Century Puritan Minister''s wife in Colonial times, "thoughts" drew me in, and I couldn''t put this book down.I loved her voice and her observations.
I originally picked this book up at an Arizona desert museum gift shop & loved it. I lent it out a few times, but then it never returned (like all great books)! I turned to Amazon & replaced it (twice now) because friendly readers who borrow tend to keep the best! If you like tales of settling the early territories, women''s journals and the beauty of ethnic cultures, you''ll want to get two of this book (one to keep, one to lend)! Enjoy!
17 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

R. Dixon
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Gift
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 11, 2019
Daughter says it’s good
One person found this helpful
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martha brown
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Super read!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 31, 2017
Outstanding story writing about early American history. I read it in two days.
One person found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Feminism did not drop out of the sky in the Sixties...
Reviewed in Germany on August 16, 2018
If I really wanted to be picky, and I don''t, I could find faults with the novel. And I certainly don''t normally go analyzing everything I read. FLIGHT OF THE SPARROW, however, practically demands it. It is a wonderful piece of literature and I congratulate Ms Belding Brown...See more
If I really wanted to be picky, and I don''t, I could find faults with the novel. And I certainly don''t normally go analyzing everything I read. FLIGHT OF THE SPARROW, however, practically demands it. It is a wonderful piece of literature and I congratulate Ms Belding Brown and the publishers on a well-executed and fascinating story. What is the purpose of a historical novel? In my opinion, non-fiction explores the dry "truths", the statistics, the dates, the consequences of people''s actions. A historical novel explores the soul of individuals within that frame of events, and should create a mirror that reflects our behaviours, thoughts, and ideas today so that we may connect and relate, but not jar us from an authentically built world in the past. This novel sucked me in and did what the best novels ought to do: it made me reflect, consider, think. When I was forced to come up for air, I did nothing but talk about it as I was still deep in the fictional world''s embrace, deeply invested in what was happening with the characters (and could hardly wait to come back to it). Mary''s personal journey, as told here--as interpreted and explored here by the author--is absolutely and wholly relatable to me. Having lived in four different countries myself, I understand how much can be absorbed and processed in a short three months when completely immersed in a new culture. And it does feel like years have passed. The culture shock and Mary''s relentless questioning of what she believed to once know is--even according to science--wholly plausible. As for the "feministic tones", I shy away from labeling for the sake of convenience and category. Women have questioned their confining roles from the beginning of time and especially when faced with a culture that does things "differently". Here, the novel has simply called that theme "freedom"; both subtly and intentionally signalled with different objects: the sparrow, the cage, the confining clothing, the deerskin dress, the wilderness, the cultivated garden. That theme is consistent throughout the book. Writing from Mary''s point-of-view, the author has managed to give her protagonist an authentic and believable voice. It stays on point, it''s well-researched in language, and well executed. In fact, the entire book sings of an incredible amount of hard work and careful consideration. When I come away from studying meaning, technique and style, however, what I celebrate most is the great story this book has to tell. AND all the new stuff I learned!
One person found this helpful
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Michal
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
New England 1600 - Settlers & Indians, love and hate
Reviewed in Canada on April 14, 2018
This book tells about the settlers in New England, the Indians who had dwelt there for ??? years and the transition from one culture to the next. The author took be back to that time with the main character. Yes, it''s a woman but it''s also about the men and children and...See more
This book tells about the settlers in New England, the Indians who had dwelt there for ??? years and the transition from one culture to the next. The author took be back to that time with the main character. Yes, it''s a woman but it''s also about the men and children and life in the 1600''s. How brave and strong these people were. Right? Wrong? It''s too late for that. I recommend this book as a look into our past and a glimpse into the events that brought us to our current democracy.
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Colleen Hough
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Clash of Cultures
Reviewed in Canada on April 6, 2015
Facinating story of 1600''s New England Puritan life that collides with Native American culture. The book was well written and gave a good feel for the restrictive religious life the early English settlers led vs the vastly different culture of the native tribes. The author...See more
Facinating story of 1600''s New England Puritan life that collides with Native American culture. The book was well written and gave a good feel for the restrictive religious life the early English settlers led vs the vastly different culture of the native tribes. The author realistically portrayed the violence and tragedy that ensued and was suffered by both sides. In the midst of this was the story of Mary who was taken captive and lived as a slave within a tribe until she was ransomed back to the English. The experience transformed her and made her question her Puritan religious beliefs. It also made her realize that she was more subjugated as a woman in New England society than she was as a captive of the natives. I highly recommend the book.
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Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online

Flight discount of the Sparrow: outlet online sale A Novel of Early America online