Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

All pages and cover are intact. Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the Library of" labels. Shrink wrap, dust jacket, or boxed set case may be missing. Item may not include bundled media. There may be some corner curling or creasing. A name or inscription may be on the inside of the front cover. Item may have minor cosmetic defects (marks, wears, cuts, bends, crushes) on the cover, spine, pages or dust cover.
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From New York Times bestselling author Tilar Mazzeo comes the extraordinary and long forgotten story of Irena Sendler—the “female Oskar Schindler”—who took staggering risks to save 2,500 children from death and deportation in Nazi-occupied Poland during World War II—now adapted for a younger audience.

Irena Sendler was a young Polish woman living in Warsaw during World War II with an incredible story of survival and selflessness. And she’s been long forgotten by history.

Until now.

This young readers edition of Irena’s Children tells Irena’s unbelievable story set during one of the worst times in modern history. With guts of steel and unfaltering bravery, Irena smuggled thousands of children out of the walled Jewish ghetto in toolboxes and coffins, snuck them under overcoats at checkpoints, and slipped them through the dank sewers and into secret passages that led to abandoned buildings, where she convinced her friends and underground resistance network to hide them.

In this heroic tale of survival and resilience in the face of impossible odds, Tilar Mazzeo and adapter Mary Cronk Farrell share the true story of this bold and brave woman, overlooked by history, who risked her life to save innocent children from the horrors of the Holocaust.

From School Library Journal

Gr 6–10—Irena Sendler, a righteous Gentile who rescued approximately 2,500 Jewish children in the Warsaw ghetto, is the focus of this volume. Sendler''s father, a Catholic doctor who treated Jews others turned away, grew up speaking Yiddish with close Jewish friends. Her senior role at a government agency positioned her to offer help following the 1939 Nazi invasion of Poland. Sendler and an inner circle of trusted friends, Jewish and Christian alike, used creative means to spirit Jewish children away to safety in orphanages and foster homes. Tortured by the Nazis, she gave up no secrets, keeping the children and her network safe. While the book is strong on general historical context, featuring descriptions of socioeconomic divisions among Jews in occupied Warsaw, it suffers from the wartime loss of direct historical evidence. Many of the individuals portrayed—Sendler included—do not feel fully fleshed out, making the narrative somewhat confusing and lessening the emotional impact. This is a story better suited to shorter treatments, such as Marcia Vaughan''s Irena''s Jars of Secrets. More readable, engaging volumes on similar individuals exist, such as Irene Gut Opdyke''s In My Hands and Alison Leslie Gold''s A Special Fate. VERDICT Purchase where there is a high demand for Holocaust nonfiction.—Laura Simeon, Open Window School Library, WA

Review

“Farrell’s adaptation of Mazzeo’s adult title (2016) clearly presents [Irena Sendler’s] life and the ever present reality of death in a sobering, heartbreaking narrative. Readers will understand how Sendler came to be honored by Israel’s Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial as one of the Righteous Among the Nations.”  ― Kirkus Reviews

About the Author

Tilar J. Mazzeo is the New York Times and San Francisco Chronicle bestselling author of books that include The Widow Clicquot, The Secret of Chanel No. 5, and Hotel on the Place Vendôme. The Clara C. Piper Associate Professor of English at Colby College, she divides her time among coastal Maine, New York City, and Saanichton, British Columbia, where she lives with her husband and stepchildren.

Mary Cronk Farrell is a former award-winning journalist and author of fiction and nonfiction books for children. She writes with passion about little-known people of history who face great adversity with courage. Her book Pure Grit: How American World War II Nurses Survived Battle and Prison Camp in the Pacific has been named a Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People, Jefferson Cup Honor Book, Washington State Book Award Finalist, Booklist Editor’s Choice, to the Amelia Bloomer Project List and awarded a EUREKA! Children’s Book Award for Excellence in Nonfiction. She lives in Washington State.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Irena’s Children

September 1, 1939


The wail of sirens dragged Irena from sleep, and she jumped up. Air-raid sirens. An attack? No. Surely, a false alarm.

She and her mother grabbed their bathrobes and slippers. Everywhere, rumpled neighbors were pouring out of their apartment buildings into the street. They peered upward. It was six o’clock in the morning and the low-lying clouds were calm, the streets empty of traffic. The air-raid wardens knew no more than the curious crowd, but shooed everyone back into their buildings. The anxiety and early hour made people cross, and somewhere in the building a door slammed. The sirens continued to wail.

Irena sat with her mother at the kitchen table and turned on Polish radio. Bleary-eyed and grim, they listened to the news. Everyone feared Germany would strike. Irena and her friends had followed news of Adolf Hitler’s rise to power in Germany and the antidemocratic policies of his National Socialist German Workers’ Party (Nazi party). The German takeover of Czechoslovakia had moved Poland to ready its military for war. But though Irena had known war would come, it was difficult to believe her country—her city—was under attack!

Hovering over the radio, Irena leaned in to hear the words. Government and city workers in the capital were instructed to stay at their posts around the clock, using all efforts to resist the German aggressors. Thank heavens. Irena wanted to do something.

Irena, stop fidgeting. A look from her mother told her to sit down and finish her coffee. What could she do anyhow? The minutes ticked by. News trickled in. German armies rolled into Poland from the south, the west, and the north.

By 7:00 a.m. Irena could no longer bear doing nothing, and she flew down the stairs to the courtyard. Tossing her weathered bag into the basket of her bicycle, Irena hitched up her skirt and pedaled quickly toward the Old Town and her office on Zlota Street. It was a relief to be off, to leave the waiting and worrying to her mother. She felt a powerful purpose and determination.

Irena worked as a senior administrator in a branch of the city social welfare office that ran soup kitchens across the city. Reaching her building, she went to look for her boss, Irena—“Irka”—Schultz, a thin, birdlike blonde with a big smile. Irka was more than her supervisor. She was one of Dr. Radlinska’s girls, just like Irena was.

While studying at the Polish Free University, Irena had found a warm welcome in Professor Helena Radlinska’s circle. The sturdy woman with thinning white hair shared the socialist ideals of Irena’s papa, and Irena missed her papa. She’d joined in the radical activism of the tight-knit group of young men and women inspired by Dr. Radlinska. And the professor had given Irena her first social work job at one of her clinics helping the poorest families in Warsaw.

Irena found her boss Irka calm and matter-of-fact, even with the city under siege. For the next few hours, the staff set in motion plans for how they might help families survive this crisis. Irena couldn’t imagine what they would face in the coming days. Who knew what war looked like until they were in it? But she knew the families she served would need her help now more than ever.

At about nine o’clock, the women dropped what they were doing. They listened to what sounded like “a faraway surf . . . not a calm surf but when waves crash onto a beach during a storm.” Then air-raid sirens pierced their ears, soon joined by a thunder of planes overhead, and Irena heard the first explosions. Bombs. She and the other women ran for cover, while the building rattled with the hum of planes, tens, maybe even hundreds and ear-splitting, ground-shaking concussions. In the cellar bomb shelters, everyone clutched hands in the musty darkness with a faint hope, listening for the Polish defensive artillery firing back.

When the pounding let up and the roar of bombers receded, it was horrible to see how much damage had been done to Warsaw. Irena looked out at a sky black with smoke. Chaos filled Zlota Street. Clouds of dust coated her throat and smoke stung her nose. Some buildings had been turned to rubble. Flames engulfed the gutted facades of entire apartment buildings. The walls swayed and then toppled in a crash to the cobblestones. Piles of bricks lay everywhere, as if thrown by an angry child, and glass and debris littered the ground. Horses fell dead, and Irena saw, there, in the midst of it all, mangled human bodies.

The first onslaught of war was dizzying, unreal. She could not imagine the horrors that were yet to come, and shuddered to think of the soldiers on the front lines, fighting to stop the Germans, the bloodshed they must be facing. A few days ago, she had said good-bye to several men leaving Warsaw for military deployment. A lawyer in the social services office, Jozef Zysman, had been called up as reserve officer, and Irena worried about his wife, Theodora. He was a prominent city attorney, often representing needy people for free. Irena had regularly waited with him in the halls of the courthouse, each of them leaning up against the stair railings and laughing. He defended people illegally evicted from their homes, and Irena was one of his favorite witnesses. She reveled in righting an injustice and could be very persuasive. She would have to check in on Theodora and their baby.

Amid the utter confusion, Irena tried to clear her mind. It was her job to provide food in this emergency. People bombed out of their homes would need shelter. She and her coworkers set up dozens of makeshift canteens and shelters. They stood by offering hot soup and blankets.

In the following days the assault was continual, flights of up to fifty bombers, exploding warheads, hitting army barracks, targeting factories, and demolishing apartment buildings, hospitals, and schools. No place was safe from the bombs. It felt especially frightening to go out in the street, but Irena had to check on the soup kitchens she had helped organize. The lines of people waiting for food included families with children of all ages, and grandparents, too.

Many had fled the countryside. They told of running from their homes as the war planes flew over their villages, seeing the bombs demolish their homes. German dive bombers screeched overhead, opening fire on the people, the unarmed, helpless people. Survivors came to Warsaw with little but the clothes they wore. Others, they said, never made it to the city.

Irena moved among the refugees, trying to comfort them. Polish and sometimes Yiddish voices surrounded her, broken with sorrow, high pitched with fear, or low with desperation. With dirty, tearstained faces, villagers recounted how they had joined the throngs of people on the roads, no place to go, but at least not alone.

There was nothing to do, they told Irena, but to keep walking. Her heart seized as she learned of the cruelty of the attacking Germans. But then, the Nazis had turned cruelty and violence against Germany’s own people who didn’t go along, like socialists, communists, and especially Jewish people. How could one brave an enemy that showed the innocent no mercy? The refugees’ plight compelled her to work long days procuring food for the soup kitchens, and investigating the ruins of the city for possible shelters for the homeless.

The Jewish families, their children lined up like stair steps, reminded her of her papa’s clinic when she was a child in Otwock. His office had often been filled with the desperate and poor. He had never turned away anyone. When he was tired, he still made rounds in the village. He treated Jewish people when other doctors refused. Her memories of Papa warmed her, for he had doted on her as a child, and in this dark time, his example of compassion became a beacon lighting her way.

Through the week, the intermittent news Irena gleaned from Polish radio did not offer much hope. German tanks and infantry had broken through Polish army defensive lines, scattering whole battalions. Polish forces retreated east in an effort to regroup. On the eighth day of the German attack, Irena learned the enemy now completely surrounded Warsaw.

The news grew worse. On September 17, the Soviet army had invaded Poland’s eastern border, and Irena could hear the artillery as the German army breached Warsaw’s defenses and poured into the city. She had no choice but to take cover as fighting erupted in the streets and the attacks from the air grew more intense.

Some of Irena’s neighbors and coworkers held on to a thread of hope as long as the fighting continued in Warsaw’s neighborhoods, but beginning the morning of September 24, the sky over Warsaw darkened with German bombers, hundreds of them—no, it had to be thousands, so many they couldn’t be counted. Bombs once again exploded in the city without stopping for hours. A full day. Two days. The floor bumped and rolled with the explosions. Surely, she’d go deaf from the incessant booming and blasting. The brown dust and smothering smoke burned Irena’s nose and lungs, stung her eyes.

When the attack finally ended, Irena took stock. From what she could learn, the Germans had clobbered entire districts of Warsaw into ruins. Debris clogged some streets entirely. Whole blocks raged with fire. Would any of them survive?

At home, Irena’s mother whispered urgent prayers. So did Irena. Still, she put more faith in action and there was more work to do than ever. Some of the worst hit areas of the city included the quarter just north of her office. A mostly Jewish neighborhood, it ran from the Jewish and Polish cemeteries on the west, to the great synagogue on the east. Irena found the homeless had crawled into overcrowded cellars, thick with the smell of gangrene, and too many bodies too close. In the air-raid shelters, the injured lay on stretchers, crying quietly and begging for water.

All the people of Warsaw suffered. There was no water, no electricity, and no longer any food. The air was rank with the smell of human and animal corpses heaped in the streets. Some kind souls buried the dead where they found them, in a garden or a square or the courtyards of houses. Famished people cut flesh from horses as soon as they perished, leaving skeletons in the street.

Irena was at the office trying to fight the chaos by establishing order in her soup kitchens when Polish radio announced the news. The mayor had surrendered the city to the Germans. Everyone in the office was crying and hugging, because it was sad and scary. Out on the street an ominous silence settled over Warsaw, eerie after nearly a month of bombardment.

As the facts became clear, the women in the office tried to comfort one another. Germany and the Soviet Union had struck a deal before the bombing started. The two countries divided Poland like two bullies stealing another boy’s marbles and splitting the spoils.

Irena and her friends had a hundred anxious questions. Would the men in the Polish army make it home? And what would they come home to? A smoldering, hungry city burying its dead.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Norm Haskett
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Must-Read Book of Incredible Courage for Young and Adult Readers
Reviewed in the United States on November 29, 2016
Though no longer a young reader, I am a huge fan of Mary Cronk Farrell, who authored Pure Grit: How American World War II Nurses Survived Battle and Prison Camp in the Pacific, Fannie Never Flinched: One Woman''s Courage in the Struggle for American Labor Union Rights, and... See more
Though no longer a young reader, I am a huge fan of Mary Cronk Farrell, who authored Pure Grit: How American World War II Nurses Survived Battle and Prison Camp in the Pacific, Fannie Never Flinched: One Woman''s Courage in the Struggle for American Labor Union Rights, and now, as an adapter, Irena''s Children: Young Readers Edition; A True Story of Courage. The story of Irena Sendler, who with her network of courageous Polish patriots, Christians and Jews alike, helped save 2,500 mostly Jewish children from overwhelming evil in the form of the Nazi SS, Gestapo, and Polish Nazis during the German occupation of her native Poland, had me often in tears. Farrell never flinched in describing the terror, torture, and fates of tens of thousands of Poles (in all, four million Polish civilians died between 1939 and 1945), and I often had to close the book, recover from what I had just read, before I could continue reading. While the reading level is appropriate for young readers especially, readers of all ages must have the strength the Polish heroes of this book had in order to read to the end. The reward for reading through the last pages is to know that Polish resistance fighters like Irena Sendler altered the course of World War II right up to today. The perpetrators of the death and concentration camps, as well as those that brought their victims to their captivity and deaths, and those that rained death and destruction on Jewish ghettos from the air or on the ground--all vividly described in this book--may mostly be dead now, but fortunately German courts have recently decreed that those who even witnessed the Holocaust were accomplices, too--that it was impossible for most of them not to be aware of their role, modest or not, in the machinery of death that led to the destruction of six million European Jews in six years. Thank you Mary Cronk Farrell for bringing us the story of "the female Oskar Schindler."
8 people found this helpful
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RN
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Definitely one of my favorite books of all time
Reviewed in the United States on October 15, 2020
This story touched my heart. I recommended it to everyone I knew after reading it, and honesty, I wish I knew more people, so everyone could enjoy this book. It is so important to remember and honor all the holocaust stories. The only thing I felt that was not super... See more
This story touched my heart. I recommended it to everyone I knew after reading it, and honesty, I wish I knew more people, so everyone could enjoy this book. It is so important to remember and honor all the holocaust stories. The only thing I felt that was not super positive was that some parts were not appropriate for a young adult book, but you kind of have to expect that when you are reading a book on WW2 or the holocaust, but overall, five stars and beyond.
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L
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wonderful story!
Reviewed in the United States on February 4, 2020
My daughter LOVES this story, but this copy has a few typos she noticed and drover her a little crazy. The story gets five stars, hands down-- she says it''s a favorite of all her school books.
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adam
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on May 21, 2018
how many of us not be here ?
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montanawoman
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
We cannot allow this to fade away.
Reviewed in the United States on May 4, 2017
Our granddaughter''s Language Arts teacher gave the class a reading assignment. This book was on the list and while someone else picked this one, our girl was very disappointed. I felt it was worth buying to continue her education and love of reading. It did not disappoint... See more
Our granddaughter''s Language Arts teacher gave the class a reading assignment. This book was on the list and while someone else picked this one, our girl was very disappointed. I felt it was worth buying to continue her education and love of reading. It did not disappoint us. It made a horrific time in history come alive for her and opened doors to communicate and ask questions. I highly recommend this book. Very well written.
4 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It will make you sad, cry
Reviewed in the United States on October 12, 2016
This book should be mandatory reading for everyone! Although this was adapted by Mary Cronk Farrell for young readers, I was quickly entranced and read it in a day. I think it also has a lesson we all need to be refreshed on, the horrific atrocities we do to those who are... See more
This book should be mandatory reading for everyone! Although this was adapted by Mary Cronk Farrell for young readers, I was quickly entranced and read it in a day. I think it also has a lesson we all need to be refreshed on, the horrific atrocities we do to those who are different from us. It will make you sad, cry, sad, and sick over the senseless cruelty, but you will feel hope when you read of the courage of Irena and her friends. I highly recommend this well written and thought provoking book for all ages!
5 people found this helpful
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lrizz
4.0 out of 5 stars
Humanity Snatching Victory from Inhumanity
Reviewed in the United States on September 28, 2016
When a book captures my interest I usually finish it in short order. Not so with this Young Readers Edition of Irena’s Children. I had to read this one in segments, allowing myself breaks to breathe fresh air and seek sunshine after being immersed in the darkness that... See more
When a book captures my interest I usually finish it in short order. Not so with this Young Readers Edition of Irena’s Children. I had to read this one in segments, allowing myself breaks to breathe fresh air and seek sunshine after being immersed in the darkness that shrouded Warsaw, Poland during World War II. I’ve read other books about the Nazi’s horrendous ethnic cleansing campaign, but I think like many readers I chose to picture the victims as adults, suppressing the fact that the children of those adults faced the same fate. That isn’t possible with Irena’s Children. Never gratuitous in its depictions, it nevertheless doesn’t shy from portraying the realities of what was at stake for those seen as undesirable, as less than human. Nor does it soften the extreme danger Irena and everyone in her network faced by choosing to risk their lives to save the lives of others. Humanity snatching victory from inhumanity.

So who should read this Young Reader’s version? Any and all adults, especially those parents and teachers whose children will be reading it. And as for those children reading it, I think it best suited to readers 12+ due to the intense nature of the subject matter. It’s definitely a book that should be discussed and the historical background explored for a fuller understanding of its topic.

Note: I received a copy of this book from the author, Mary Cronk Farrell. Mary is also a friend of mine, but that in no way influenced my review. Mary always has and always will tackle hard topics with skill and finesse.
9 people found this helpful
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Live Outside
5.0 out of 5 stars
Wonderful story which occurred during WWII
Reviewed in the United States on February 4, 2017
I had to read this children’s novel after reading Irena''s Children: The Extraordinary Story of the Woman Who Saved 2,500 Children from the Warsaw Ghetto which is the adult version of this novel. Written for middle school or older readers, this novel tells the story of... See more
I had to read this children’s novel after reading Irena''s Children: The Extraordinary Story of the Woman Who Saved 2,500 Children from the Warsaw Ghetto which is the adult version of this novel. Written for middle school or older readers, this novel tells the story of Irena Sendler, an extraordinary woman who saved thousands of children in Poland during WWI. Working in the social welfare office, Irena was constantly looking for ways to help the children in this war-torn city. Making up names, she would fake interviews so she could obtain aid to get money to help these children survive. Afraid that the Germans would check on this operation, Irena put the notions that the children had contagious diseases, which keep the Germans at bay. As the situation became direr, Irena found more individuals to help with her cause. Irena was a fighter. She became more determined to help these children survive, they started smuggling items into the ghetto in which the children lived and they tried helping them escape out of the ghetto’s walls. It was a continuous fight, one that took its toll on both the children, the parents, Irena and her team.

The novel showed the hardship that everyone endured as they tried to do the best for the family as this war played out beside them. The decisions that the families had to make, sometimes split-minute decisions as their children’s lives were on the line. The Germans were not stopping, they had a job to do and Irena had a job to do and unfortunately these two jobs were not the same. There is a ton of information inside this novel, an abundance of activity and a lot of characters to keep the pages turning. The novel included black-and-white photographs with captions which I felt brought the story closer to home. There were killing taking place daily, these deaths are hard to keep track of, and the methods that they were using, varied. I highly recommend this novel but with reservations. I believe that it should only be read by individuals who are acknowledgeable in this fight. It should be read by older readers who can manage the text and its contents for it is a difficult subject. I was very happy that the adult novel and this novel were very much alike, I was glad that Irena’s story was not minimized and that her fight in Poland was not down-played in this children’s novel.
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Top reviews from other countries

Newbigginboy
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 18, 2021
read this in one sitting which is normally a good sign - a great if tragic story of courage in the face of horrific circumstances
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_joeesmith1611_
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lovely children''s book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 15, 2019
Lovely book to help children understand sensitive history in a beautiful way. Cannot get my son to read anything but he loves this book!
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Mrs Kathryn M Barkway
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 13, 2018
Great read for Y9 history project .
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Ladybug
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A MUST READ!
Reviewed in Canada on March 7, 2019
A reminder of the horrific times, challenges and sorrow we all endured! Read it in 2 days & felt such an accomplishment that this woman had such ''chutzpah'' & bravery to help so very many victims.
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Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale

Irena's sale Children: Young Readers Edition; A True lowest Story of Courage outlet online sale