Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale
Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale__front

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Description

Product Description

Award-winning chef Marc Vetri wanted to write his first book about pasta. Instead, he wrote two other acclaimed cookbooks and continued researching pasta for ten more years. Now, the respected master of Italian cuisine finally shares his vast knowledge of pasta, gnocchi, and risotto in this inspiring, informative primer featuring expert tips and techniques, and more than 100 recipes.

Vetri’s personal stories of travel and culinary discovery in Italy appear alongside his easy-to-follow, detailed explanations of how to make and enjoy fresh handmade pasta. Whether you’re a home cook or a professional, you’ll learn how to make more than thirty different types of pasta dough, from versatile egg yolk dough, to extruded semolina dough, to a variety of flavored pastas—and form them into shapes both familiar and unique. In dishes ranging from classic to innovative, Vetri shares his coveted recipes for stuffed pastas, baked pastas, and pasta sauces. He also shows you how to make light-as-air gnocchi and the perfect dish of risotto. 

Loaded with useful information, including the best way to cook and sauce pasta, suggestions for substituting pasta shapes, and advance preparation and storage notes, Mastering Pasta offers you all of the wisdom of a pro. For cooks who want to take their knowledge to the next level, Vetri delves deep into the science of various types of flour to explain pasta’s uniquely satisfying texture and how to craft the very best pasta by hand or with a machine. Mastering Pasta is the definitive work on the subject and the only book you will ever need to serve outstanding pasta dishes in your own kitchen.

Review

“In my mind, Marc Vetri is one of the best pasta chefs on the planet. This is the pasta bible, written in the most beautiful way. Everyone needs a copy of this book on their shelf.” —Jamie Oliver, chef, restaurateur, cookbook author, and media personality

“Marc Vetri is not your Nonna, but he’s the next best thing, marrying Old World technique with New World flavors. A thoroughly modern and mouthwatering pasta master class.” —Dan Barber, chef and co-owner of Blue Hill and Blue Hill at Stone Barns

Mastering Pasta is a true ode to one of the most beloved foods in the world. This is a cookbook that captures Marc Vetri’s passion for his craft and talent as a chef.” —Nathan Myhrvold, author of Modernist Cuisine

“When it comes to pasta I have never had any better than those that come from the hands of Marc Vetri—and that includes dozens of trips to Italy.  I have said it for years that if there is one chef that could cook my last meal it would be Marc, and although I adore all his food, I think I would ask for ten courses of pasta because it is just that transcendent.  This book will become the bible of all things pasta and help all of us continue to understand the perfect marriage between different flours that help create its magic.  I''m sure Marc is not only proud of this masterpiece but also happy that chefs from around the globe will stop calling, texting, and emailing him for his fantastic recipes, techniques, and insight on all things pasta, since he put all the secrets right in this book!” —Michael Symon, chef, restaurateur, television personality, and author

“I love Italian food but I am kind of a bozo in the kitchen. Marc’s cookbooks have been great guides for me and I know this book will help me step up my pasta-making skills. Alright, that’s enough. Quit reading this and go eat pasta!” —Aziz Ansari, actor and comedian

“Early on in Mastering Pasta, Chef Vetri tells us that recipes need cooks. True, but as cooks we need chefs like Marc to push us in an uncompromising pursuit to fully understand, and ultimately find, the beauty in our food. He does that page after page.” —Dr. Stephen Jones, director of the Bread Lab, Washington State University

About the Author

Marc Vetri is the chef and founder of Philadelphia’s Vetri Family of Restaurants, which operates a collection of the country’s most critically acclaimed Italian restaurants: Vetri, Osteria (Philadelphia and Moorestown, NJ), Amis, Alla Spina, Pizzeria Vetri, and Lo Spiedo. Classically trained in Bergamo, Italy, Vetri is known the world over for bringing a bold, contemporary sensibility to classic Italian cooking. He is a member of Food & Wine magazine’s 1999 “Best New Chefs” class and the 2005 winner of the James Beard Award for “Best Chef Mid-Atlantic.” He is also the author of two cookbooks, Il Viaggio di Vetri and Rustic Italian Food. Outside the kitchen, Vetri is the driving force behind the Vetri Foundation, a non-profit organization whose mission is to help kids experience the connection between healthy eating and healthy living. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife, Megan, and their three children. 

David Joachim has authored, edited, or collaborated on more than forty cookbooks, including the multi-award-winner The Science of Good Food and million-copy bestselling series A Man, A Can, A Plan. He writes a column for Fine Cooking magazine called “The Science Of . . .” and his writing and recipes have appeared in numerous magazines such as USA Today, Men’s Health, Better Homes & Gardens, Cooking Light, Women’s Health, Cook’s Illustrated, Fine Cooking, and Bicycling. He is also the co-founder of Chef Salt, a line of artisanal salt seasonings. Joachim lives in Center Valley, PA, and his favorite cooking tool is a leaf blower.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Pappardelle with Rabbit Ragù and Peaches

I’ve always been fascinated by the way fruits play so well in savory cooking. Porcini and peaches. Oxtail with Italian mustard fruits. Duck with grapes. When we started making
this rabbit ragù, it needed a little pop, but adding vinegar or lemon juice wasn’t enough. Fruit gave it so much more—acid, sugar, aroma, and something to bite into. Pappardelle
are traditionally cooked with a ragù made from game meats, and in Tuscany, the game is often wild hare or rabbit.

Pasta Swap For a ragù like this, I prefer a thicker noodle. That’s why I went with pappardelle. But square fazzoletti make a great substitute. They will wrap around the meat and sauce nicely and give you a big bite of pasta.

1 rabbit (about 3 lb/1.4 kg)
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons (45 ml) grapeseed or canola oil
1⁄3 cup (41 g) peeled and chopped carrot
1⁄3 cup (34 g) chopped celery
1⁄3 cup (56 g) chopped red onion
1⁄3 cup (79 ml) dry white wine
¾ cup (135 g) cherry tomatoes, halved
8 ounces (227 g) Egg Yolk Dough (page 26), rolled into sheets about 1⁄8 inch (3 mm) thick
¼ cup (60 ml) extra-virgin olive oil
6 tablespoons (85 g) unsalted butter
¼ cup (25 g) grated Parmesan cheese, plus some for garnish
2 ripe peaches, halved, pitted, and thinly sliced

Heat the oven to 350°F (175°C).

Rinse the rabbit and remove the innards and excess fat deposits. Reserve the innards for another use. Remove the hind legs and forelegs by driving your knife straight through the hip and shoulder joints. Cut each leg in half through the center joint. Snip through the breastbone with kitchen shears, and then cut the rabbit crosswise into 6 to 8 pieces. Season the rabbit pieces all over with salt and pepper.

Heat the grapeseed oil in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, add the rabbit pieces, in batches if necessary to prevent crowding, and sear them, turning them once, until they are golden brown on both sides, about 5 minutes per side. Transfer the pieces to a platter as they are done.

Add the carrot, celery, and onion to the same pan and cook over medium heat until the vegetables are lightly browned, about 4 minutes. Pour in the wine and simmer, scraping
up any browned bits on the pan bottom, until the liquid evaporates, 2 to 3 minutes. Return the rabbit to the pan along with the tomatoes. Pour in enough water to come three-fourths of the way up the sides of the ingredients. Cover the pan and braise the rabbit in the oven until it is tender and the meat pulls easily away from the bone, 1 to 1½ hours.

Let the rabbit cool slightly in the pan, then shred the meat and discard the skin and bones. Pass the vegetables and braising liquid through a food mill fitted with the medium die, or pulse them briefly in a food processor just until the vegetables are finely chopped but not pureed. Return the ragù to the pan. If it is thin and watery, boil it over medium heat until it has reduced to a thick consistency similar to that of tomato sauce.

Return the shredded meat to the ragù. Taste it, adding salt and pepper until it tastes good to you. You should have about 2 cups (473 ml) ragù. Use it immediately, or transfer it to an airtight container and refrigerate it for up to 3 days or freeze it for up to 2 months. Reheat the ragù before proceeding with the recipe.

Lay a pasta sheet on a lightly floured work surface and trim the edges square. Cut the sheet crosswise into strips a little less than 1 inch (2.5 cm) wide, preferably with a fluted cutter. Repeat with the second sheet. Dust the strips with flour, cover them, and use them within 1 hour or refrigerate them for up to 4 hours. You can also freeze them in a single layer, transfer them to a zipper-lock bag, and freeze them for up to 1 month. Take the pasta straight from the freezer to the boiling pasta water.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Drop in the pappardelle and cover the pot to quickly return the water to a boil. Cook the pasta until it is tender but still a little chewy when bitten, about 2 minutes. Using a spider strainer or tongs, drain the pasta by transferring it to the pan of ragù. Reserve the pasta water.

Add the oil and butter to the pan and cook over medium-high heat, tossing and stirring vigorously, until the sauce reduces slightly, becomes creamy, and coats the pasta, about 1 minute. Add a little pasta water if necessary to create a creamy sauce. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the Parmesan. Keep the pasta moving until pasta and sauce become one thing in the pan. Taste it, adding salt and pepper until it tastes good to you. Stir in the peaches.
Dish out the pasta onto warmed plates and garnish each serving with some Parmesan.

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Customer reviews

4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
1,394 global ratings

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Top reviews from the United States

ShannonG
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
No Mastery Offfered in This Book
Reviewed in the United States on January 27, 2018
The title says you''ll gain "mastery" over pasta. But not really. The book would be more appropriately titled "Pasta For Beginners Plus Some Recipes for Advanced Chefs With Access To Rare Ingredients". The book had useful stuff but probably not a... See more
The title says you''ll gain "mastery" over pasta. But not really. The book would be more appropriately titled "Pasta For Beginners Plus Some Recipes for Advanced Chefs With Access To Rare Ingredients".

The book had useful stuff but probably not a good choice if you''re only going to read one book about pasta. For starters, it''s 10% about making pasta and the rest a bunch of obscure recipes that have various noodles in them. It contains several inaccuracies and cooking myths that avid cooks will probably know but the casual beginner won''t recognize and will take to heart as fact. Example? That boiling more water vs less will allow the pot to return to boil more quickly after adding your pasta. FALSE. Just a silly grandma cooking myth. There were others as well.

Also, there is very little discussion on shaping pasta beyond some minor overview of rolling out dough. The approach for knife-cut pasta, sheets for ravioli, hand shaped, and extruded noodles are worth an entire chapter if you''re going to "master pasta". Which should be drier? Wetter? Stronger dough? Weaker dough? It only received a single paragraph in the book barely hinting at what you need to know.

So what do you do after you cut your pasta? Boil immediately? Dry it? Hang it? Refrigerate? Freeze? How does one create a nest that won''t stick together after the noodles are cut? Those are mysteries unknown to this book mastering pasta.

Interested in flavored and colored pastas like squid ink pasta? Spinach pasta? Not going to find out anything about that in this book.

I also felt that a more thorough discussion on pasta shapes would''ve been warranted for a book proclaiming to master pasta. What influence does the pasta shape and size have on the sauce and final product to consider? Ridges? Tubes? Folds? Thick vs thin? Only a few sentences were offered about this.
148 people found this helpful
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Marcel Tomkins
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lost credibility on page 10
Reviewed in the United States on December 17, 2018
On page 10 the author makes an outright false statement about wheat -- that some flavorful wheats not suited for large scale industrial bread bakeries were "too nutritious for our commodity wheat markets." That''s an absurd statement which doesn''t follow at all from the... See more
On page 10 the author makes an outright false statement about wheat -- that some flavorful wheats not suited for large scale industrial bread bakeries were "too nutritious for our commodity wheat markets." That''s an absurd statement which doesn''t follow at all from the information he provides before. There are many reasons why some wheats cannot be used in industrial bakeries. Some of the resultant doughs cannot be handled by industrial baking equipment. Most are grown in miniscule quantities and yield far less per acre than other wheats. High nutrition is never a reason why these wheats are not used on a large scale. After this erroneous statement earlier in the book, everything that comes after seems questionable.
36 people found this helpful
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mdsawyermd
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mastering Disappointment
Reviewed in the United States on April 17, 2020
Really not about "mastering pasta". I expected a class in making pasta at home, how to make the various shapes, cooking it, perfecting it, tools, where to get them, etc. Nope. You''ll learn more about those things from watching a half an hour of... See more
Really not about "mastering pasta". I expected a class in making pasta at home, how to make the various shapes, cooking it, perfecting it, tools, where to get them, etc.

Nope.

You''ll learn more about those things from watching a half an hour of YouTube videos from Pasta Grannies and Eataly''s pasta guy.

This is a slapdash mess, a few unhelpful pictures that fail to really show how to make various pasta shapes by hand, an astonishing lack of instructional pictures on some very esoteric pasta shapes, some complicated recipes. It goes back and forth from a cookbook (not wanted) to too easy and basic to making assumptions about the reader being a semi-expert already.

And risotto and gnocchi? Waste of space.

I''m completely baffled by the recommendations for this book. It doesn''t teach what is says it does. At all.
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James EllsworthTop Contributor: Cooking
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Best to Turn to Old Friends: Jim Beard and Marcella Hazan
Reviewed in the United States on March 25, 2015
Mark Vetri is a talented professional chef. I am an advanced home cook. But when Mario Batali opined that this was ''the single most important book on handmade pasta I have ever read'' and Jamie Oliver concluded ''Everyone needs a copy of this book on their shelves'', I made... See more
Mark Vetri is a talented professional chef. I am an advanced home cook. But when Mario Batali opined that this was ''the single most important book on handmade pasta I have ever read'' and Jamie Oliver concluded ''Everyone needs a copy of this book on their shelves'', I made the purchase. Okay...I''ve been making pasta at home for thirty years, I''ve attended a pasta class in Italy and I have owned and used ''Beard on Pasta'' and ''The Essentials of Italian Cuisine'' by Marcella Hazan for years. I am motivated to learn about pasta. But...what I expected from the promo for this book and what I found between the covers was disappointing. Bottom line: this book is a chef speaking to chefs. The fine first chapters on flours and making fresh and dried pasta dough will serve all-comers well, whether you are a beginner or are advanced. Unfortunately, that beginning gives way to a set of recipes that would challenge the home cook''s pantry: ''Talleggio (that''s a cheese) Ravioli with Radicchio, Honey and Walnuts,'' ''Pea Agnolotti with Lardo,'' ''Fig and Onion Caramella with Gorgonzola Fonduta...'' Doppio Ravioli with Lamb and Polenta takes many steps and a good bit of time to prepare--assuming you have lamb and polenta on hand. Other enticing recipes call for foie gras terrine, octopus, scorpion fish, morel mushrooms, peekytoe crab--you get the idea. For sure, the book has beautiful pictures, is written intelligently and can provide ''inspiration''...but my inspiration was to find a high-end Italian restaurant and make a reservation!

So...does this book ''reinvent the wheel'' as far as most of us are concerned? Purists may cringe when James Beard--responding to what his reader''s pantries would have on hand, says ''all-purpose flour'' works best in America. I order a well-known Italian-milled Doppio Zero by mail order...but Beard is not wrong. I began by using unbleached all-purpose flour in my noodles. (He also includes recipes using pasta flour blends of white and whole wheat, buckwheat...even yeasted noodles courtesy of Barbra Kafka. Here is also where I learned about gnocchi. But, maybe you want a recipe for Kreplach. Beard has it. Marcella offers a 115 page section devoted to pasta and sauces in ''Essentials'': she is concise about explaining the use of doppio zero, semolina and other flours before also saying that she prefers to use unbleached all purpose flour for making pasta in America...even if she has other options. She provides fine instruction on mixing, rolling and shaping dough into pasta forms. She speaks to the importance of bronze dies on extruding machines, just as Chef Vetri does. Her sauces include the time-honoured, lip-smacking classics--and that makes all the difference in usability at home. These books will better serve beginning and advanced home chefs. But maybe readers are looking for recipes on the somewhat unrelated subject of risotto? Marcella''s 17 pages of recipes will do for most of us. Both of these books would ''push Mr. Vetri''s book off the shelf'' in home kitchens...which is some different than concluding that everyone needs to have this book on their shelf.
574 people found this helpful
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Anonymous 644
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Covers everything you need to know!
Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2018
Fantastic book! I bought this book before I tried making my first homemade pasta. After reading this I viewed making pasta dough in a complete different way than I would have if I would have just tried a recipe off Pinterest . It explains everything you need to know in... See more
Fantastic book! I bought this book before I tried making my first homemade pasta. After reading this I viewed making pasta dough in a complete different way than I would have if I would have just tried a recipe off Pinterest . It explains everything you need to know in detail. From different types of wheat, how and why they affect flavor and texture. The importance of fresh ground flour for flavor and nutrients. The different grinds of flour and flour protein amount, how they affect texture and chew. Also how whole eggs, egg yolks, and oils affect the pasta dough. He offers many recipes for many doughs. I found it very inspiring and was excited to go straight to the store and find different flours mentioned in the book to experiment with! Being an adventurous eater I just loved the recipes! They range from furmiliar to a bit exotic! For example. Some recipes include traditional bolognese, ricotta ravioli, spaghetti with tomato basil sauce, pappardelle with rabbit ragu, culurgiones with sweetbreads (veal brain). Unfortunately I live in a rural area far away from the ocean where I cannot get some things for the recipes such as peekytoe crab. It also covers flavoring pasta dough with things like squid ink or parsley. There are chapters on hand forming pasta, pasta sauces, gnocchi and risotto which were a pleasant surprise! I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in making pasta! It captures the history and tradition of Italy and pasta plus an incredible amount of technical information on making your pasta dough!
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Teamster
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Deceptive Title!
Reviewed in the United States on July 24, 2020
I agree with most of the reviews on this book. It is not about mastering the techniques of Fresh Pasta, this is more about the author showing off his favorite recipes(which look delicious) and regaling you with anecdotes about culinary luminaries he''s crossed paths with in... See more
I agree with most of the reviews on this book. It is not about mastering the techniques of Fresh Pasta, this is more about the author showing off his favorite recipes(which look delicious) and regaling you with anecdotes about culinary luminaries he''s crossed paths with in his career and great pasta dishes he''s eaten. What little technical info there is in this book about making Pasta dough is done in an off hand way, leaving tons of details out. I don''t think it ocurred to this author and his publisher that a lot of the nicely photographed dishes in the book would be impossible to make unless the dough making and shaping proceesses were explained in more detail to the home cook.

My final opinion: this book will not make you a master of fresh pasta, but it is a wonderful ego trip for Marc Vetri.
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Hunter Angler Gardener CookTop Contributor: Cooking
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the Best Pasta Books Out There
Reviewed in the United States on March 26, 2015
Marc Vetri is one of America’s best Italian chefs, and the Philly native’s latest book is a technique-driven walk through the process of making all kinds of pasta and gnocchi. Even though Vetri’s a chef and many of his recipes are derived from his restaurants, the book is... See more
Marc Vetri is one of America’s best Italian chefs, and the Philly native’s latest book is a technique-driven walk through the process of making all kinds of pasta and gnocchi. Even though Vetri’s a chef and many of his recipes are derived from his restaurants, the book is firmly grounded as an instructional guide for the home cook. Mastering Pasta is a beautiful book, heavy on photos of the actual making of the shapes, which is key. I especially like the decision to show that homemade pasta is by nature a bit erratic: Not every strand of hand-cut tagliatelle will be the same width, and there will be little creases where you’d folded the dough over. Vetri’s recipes can get a bit esoteric, but he’s very good about offering alternatives if you can’t find sweetbreads or fresh porcini or snails.

My main beef with the book is Vetri’s basic dough. His batch is 395 grams, about 2 1/2 cups of various flours, moistened with 9 egg yolks, plus some water and olive oil. Sorry, but I can''t see blasting through a whole carton of eggs for a batch of pasta that will serve 4 or 5 people. I mean I understand why Vetri does this: He runs a restaurant. He’s trying to make a plate of pasta a special thing on a menu in a lovely restaurant. And his dough is indeed wonderful. But it’s just too spendy for a Wednesday night. And, given that you can whip up a basic batch of pasta in an hour, it’s not crazy to think that some cooks might want to make pasta regularly, and not for special occasions. My advice: For day-to-day pasta making, use the Italian standard of 1 whole egg for every 100 grams of flour and you’ll be fine.

That said, I love this book. Vetri’s flavors and originality are remarkable. Hell, he’s even created a new pasta shape called “dove pasta,” which looks a bit like the eagle pattern you see in Southwest Indian weaving. I’ll definitely be making that. His technical sections are my favorite part of the book, and are useful no matter what you put on your pasta. His section on wheat is fascinating. What wheat you use actually matters, and they tell you why. Vetri shows you pasta shapes you’ve never seen before, combined with flavors you hadn’t thought of.

Bottom line: Buy this book if you’ve made pasta at least a few times before, and want to drill down deeply into the subject. Vetri is a master and it shows, and his recipes, instruction and flavors are top notch.
112 people found this helpful
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s593tp
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Such great and thorough education on flour
Reviewed in the United States on September 22, 2016
This book is Heaven. Such great and thorough education on flour, dough and the process of pasta making. My one and only complaint is that a lot of the recipes call for ingredients that aren''t easily located in your pantry or your local grocery store. I love Marc Vetri: he... See more
This book is Heaven. Such great and thorough education on flour, dough and the process of pasta making. My one and only complaint is that a lot of the recipes call for ingredients that aren''t easily located in your pantry or your local grocery store. I love Marc Vetri: he is truly a Master, but when it comes to writing a cookbook for non-chefs, it''s important to keep that in mind. I like Octopus and will eat it in a restaurant but I really don''t know what to do with it if it was an ingredient in my refrigerator. The thing is, it''s not just one recipe or I wouldn''t bother to mention it. For some chefs in regions where certain ingredients are readily available (big cities) and who cook with less mainstream items this won''t be a problem. The recipes are relatively easy to prepare.
I am still giving it 5 stars because it''s a wonderful book, that is lovingly written and simply gorgeous.
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Top reviews from other countries

Kindle Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not a basic pasta book.....
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 13, 2018
This is an informative book written by an american restaurant chef. Ingredients are described in US terms although quantities are given in metric and imperial units. My reservation about the book (reason for 3 stars) is the quantity of egg yolks required for the pasta dough...See more
This is an informative book written by an american restaurant chef. Ingredients are described in US terms although quantities are given in metric and imperial units. My reservation about the book (reason for 3 stars) is the quantity of egg yolks required for the pasta dough eg. Basic Egg Yolk Dough requires 9 egg yolks - the quantity of dough produced is approx 1 lb/454 grams, whilst the Rich Egg Yolk Dough uses 20 egg yolks for the same yield. This seemed a little extravagant. Basic pasta is more frugal. Restaurants may have uses for lots of spare egg whites but I wonder about the domestic cook. My recommendation for a fresh pasta cookbook for UK cooks looking for practical and more economical recipes would be: Pasta - Antonio Carluccio https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1849497966/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A1179QB3UI4TV4&psc=1 OR Gino''s Pasta (Gino D’Acampo) https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ginos-Pasta-Gino-DAcampo/dp/0857832115/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1534165332&sr=1-4&keywords=gino+d%27acampo+cookery+books
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josh lumley
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautiful book with lots of inspiration and wonderful recipes
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 4, 2019
Mastering Pasta: The Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto takes you through the life of pasta, from how it is made and the science behind it, to recipes and how to make certain types of pasta. Whilst the book takes you through many aspects it doesnt...See more
Mastering Pasta: The Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and Risotto takes you through the life of pasta, from how it is made and the science behind it, to recipes and how to make certain types of pasta. Whilst the book takes you through many aspects it doesnt always hold your hand, i personally like this as cooking is subjective; as stated at the start of the book (paraphrasing) all cooking environments are different and what is cooked in one kitchen will be vastly different to another. The book helps to give you insight to different meals and flavours that can be accomplished by trying something a little different and not sticking to your standard carbonara or spaghetti bolognese, it should be used as a knowledge base for any budding amateur chef who wishes to improve their skills in pasta making
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5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The ''go to'' book for pasta
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 12, 2018
If you are into pasta then this interesting book is a must. Informative and instructive. It''s good to have it in a hard cover although I refer to it so much I may have to get another one ''for best''.
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Pierre P.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wonderfull book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 18, 2016
We already did some recipe from that book and they turned amazing. Everything is well explained and it is far more then a recipe book. Explanation about wheat, flour, hydratation and so on make it a useful resource for any one that what to go into pasta making or refine...See more
We already did some recipe from that book and they turned amazing. Everything is well explained and it is far more then a recipe book. Explanation about wheat, flour, hydratation and so on make it a useful resource for any one that what to go into pasta making or refine his/her skill set.
6 people found this helpful
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Jess
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Beautiful photos and genius flavour combinations
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 28, 2016
As a classically trained chef, this book really appealed to me for its creative variations on several types of pasta. Beautiful photos and genius flavour combinations. Ingredients are accessible and recipes are achievable, even for competent home cooks. Different than your...See more
As a classically trained chef, this book really appealed to me for its creative variations on several types of pasta. Beautiful photos and genius flavour combinations. Ingredients are accessible and recipes are achievable, even for competent home cooks. Different than your typical Italian pasta cook book and exactly what I was looking for. Would make for very impressive dinner party features. Definitely an MVP in my cookbook collection.
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Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale

Mastering Pasta: The new arrival Art and Practice of Handmade Pasta, Gnocchi, and lowest Risotto [A Cookbook] sale